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25' shallow well driving

Discussion in 'Michigan Homesteading and Home Improvement' started by jfishbones, Aug 11, 2017.

  1. jfishbones

    jfishbones

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    I have been reading some of the threads on driving a shallow 1 1/4" well and was wondering if anyone has ever just used the bucket on a front loader to drive the pipe?
    I was thinking of loading if with dirt for weight and just keep tapping down on the cap.
    Good idea or bad?
     
  2. Rasputin

    Rasputin Premium Member

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    What will you be going through? The few times I drove a well, didnt hit any hard pan, easy to drive by hand. I've also used the sand sucker method. All depends on what's under you, but I would be afraid to use the loafer to drive it, might bend it. Would be a great tool to pull it, though.
     
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  3. Scout 2

    Scout 2

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    Loader on a tractor will not do it. I tried. I drove one part way with my skidsteer because of the weight. I agree with the other reply it would be very easy to bend the pipe or break a joint. When you drive it make sure to keep the pipe level and joint tight or they will break. They are easy to drive in sand soil but here my is 43 foot deep and I augered it about 20 feet to get thru the rocks and hardpan. After that it went very easy. I drove several 2 inch wells downstate using a thing I fixed up on my tractor. Go to a rental place and rent an electric post hole driver they work great
     
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  4. jfishbones

    jfishbones

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    Thanks Guys, I am in Millington, soil is a sandy loam. I am thinking of taking my 3 point auger and go down 5' with that to get started then drive the rest. Well reports from neighbors shows about 25 ft to water.
     
  5. Scout 2

    Scout 2

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    Keep turning your pipe to tighten the threads as you go. If it stops and won't go any deeper turn your pipe to loosen it. Make sure you have a drive point on your pipe or you will rip the screen. A drive point has a bigger head than the dia of the pipe
     
  6. jfishbones

    jfishbones

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    The well point I got was a drive point so I should be good.
    Local rental place rents a compressor with a 65lb air driver, that should work?
     
  7. tdejong302

    tdejong302

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    I use a post hole digger that you turn. Its not the type that you use w/ handles that open up. It attaches to a 3/4 pipe and your turn it. I bought 5 ft. sections that go down to 20 ft. When I hit wet sandy soil it will no longer pull it out. I drive from there. It takes a couple hours if you dont' hit anything hard. Put in 3 wells in the last 5 years doing it. Works awesome. Use good sealer on your joints w/ pipe tread tape and your good to go. Fill it when you have water.
     
  8. Steve

    Steve Staff Member Admin

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    If you have a backhoe dig as deep a pit as you feel safe working in, then start pounding. Digging is easier than pounding. As the previous posters said, make sure you turn the pipe occasionally to keep it tight and use drive couplings for the pipe.
     
  9. Jiw275

    Jiw275

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    I suggest using a 2" point. You can run a smaller pump if you like & still upgrade to a larger pump if needed in the future. This is a result of my learning the hard (more expensive) way.

    If near a tool rental shop, you can read an electric jack hammer with a drive point bit for around $100.00

    Good luck.
     
  10. jfishbones

    jfishbones

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    Thanks for the info.
     
  11. jfishbones

    jfishbones

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    My local rental had an electric jack hammer but only a regular point and a flat style drive point.
    I was looking for one with a coupling that would slide over the drive cap and pound it in.
    seems like if I tried to drive it down with just a drive point it would continually bounce off the drive cap? Am I wrong?
     
  12. big show

    big show

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    You could've been done already if you used a post driver. The drive cap won't fit into a post driver though, so you need a sacrificial coupling to protect the threads.
     
  13. jfishbones

    jfishbones

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    I have a back / neck issue so post driver is out of the question. I drove a well this way when I was younger in sand, piece of cake. My ground is pretty clay / loam. I went down 4' with my 3pt post hole auger and she is clay wall all the way so I have a feeling its going to be a little tough driving.
     
  14. I am sure you have found your water source spot but If you are guessing where water might be or basing it on a convenient location I strongly recommend using/make a pair of dowsing rods. The dam things work perfectly they will pinpoint reasonably depth water in a jiff. My homemade pair have never let me down locating shallow well water sources
    well1.jpg
    dowsing rods.JPG
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2017 at 1:35 PM
  15. multibeard

    multibeard Premium Member

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    I have never used them to find water but all I use to find water lines, phone lines. and cable TV lines is a couple of pieces of coat hanger bent in an ell shape.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2017 at 2:22 PM