Indian arrowheads

Discussion in 'Michigan Non-Game Animals, Plants, and Scenery' started by hypox, Aug 31, 2001.


  1. HI there, I'm new here and looking for a little guidance as far as searching for arrowheads down in the se area of Michigan. I am 10 minutes from lake St. Clair but there aren't many creeks or rivers nearby. I am located in Madison Heights. If anyone knows of any place nearby I'd appreciate it. Thanks!
     

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  2. Anybody have info on this head?
     

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  3. Well, this thread brought back some old memories. The farm I grew up on near the Titabawassee River had a sand ridge. On this ridge we found lots of indian arrow heads and tools. The two pictures below are of a hammer or pecking stone. It could have been used to knock off shards of flint for arrow heads or maybe used to "peck" on stones to form them into tools. This tool was shaped and fits perfectly in your hand. You can see the end of the stone was used for a long time.

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  4. These are three nicely made arrow heads I found. It was interesting to see that some points were very well made and some of them looked like lopsided duds. I don't know if the duds were rejects or just an indian with new or crappy knaping skills. :D

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    The points below are some examples of different styles. The light colored broken one on the left actually has a hole that goes thru it. (maybe it was the first fishing point to tie a string to it):idea:
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  5. This arrow head below is unique for a couple of reasons. First, the flint is a type not common for the area and must of been traded for or obtained on an extended trip. Also, I believe it was an unfinished point. There is a large chunk missing and it almost looks like the flint had a flaw or the indian messed up knapping it. That side of the point has too much material left on it to be balanced and I speculate that it was never used.

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    Below are examples of size extreams. The small arrow head laying on the quarter was probably a bird hunting point. The larger of the two may have been a "blank" that was a roughed out point to be finished later. I'm not an expert and all this info is what I've been told over the years.

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    #35 stevebrandle, Oct 13, 2010
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2010
  6. The pic below is of pieces of a pipe probably made in Europe. These were a long slender stem with a small bowl on the end. I can only speculate who owned it or how it got to this place. Also, in the pic is a clay marble. I was told it may have been placed in cooking pots to help them boil (small stones were used too) or it may just be a marble lost more recently. I can't imagine how it ended up in the middle of our field.

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    This pic below is a small drill bit.
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    I'm not sure what this tool is. It almost looks like it could have been mounted to a stick like an arrow head or turned side-ways like a hammer or something.

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    And now the sad part of my story. The sand ridge where all of these things (and much more) came from does not exist any more. The land was sold and the sand with everything it still held was hauled away. The field was leveled and became a subdivision. I was still a teenager then and nobody I talked to felt it was worth protecting. I frantically searched for stuff that was uncovered by the excavator, but I know much was lost. As the sand was dug away I found many darkened spots in it that was below the topsoil. These were fire pits that usually held burnt stones and sometimes flint scrap when I carefully dug into them. To the excavator's credit; he moved many yards of sand and dumped it where I could hand dig thru it when I found that evidence.

    This place wasn't the only spot things could be found then. I learned of other sites from an old guy I met who was walking a field I knew about. He was a member of the local amateur archeology group and he showed me places to find indian pottery pieces and flint tools. One summer we did a few digs where each layer of soil was skimmed off; a little at a time; to carefully extract relics. It was mostly a lot of digging, but once in a while we'd find some neat stuff.
     
  7. Looks like quite the collection. :yikes:. Must have been exciting finding all that. I couldn't beleive I found the one that I did. After looking in to it more, it sound like a lot of stone points are found. I would love to find more.
     
  8. ok this is probably nothing but you never know, but do you guys think that this could be some Indian tool.???

    (sorry the pics are kind of crappy.)
     

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  9. The larger could be a scraper (for hides, etc.), but neither of them have the "look" of an artifact. My 2 cents....
     
  10. I think this is pretty neat. My boy found it in the back yard with his metal detector. He's found a ton of stuff, as we live on a river, and old stuff is always working its way out of the banks (cans, bottles, misc metal stuff, etc). I had no idea what it was, but googled "strengthen the arm of liberty"
    (what is written across the bottom) and found out it is an old Boy scout neckercheif (sp?) slide. They made them to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Boy scouts in 1950.

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    I'll have to start keeping my eyes open for some arrow heads I think, those are pretty neat!
     
  11. Those "three nicely made arrow heads" look like they were made with Bayport chert (assuming you found them in MI). There are 2 places in MI where indigenous people mined projectile point chert: Norwood (near Charlevoix) and Bayport (Saginaw basin). Bayport chert is uniformly dark grey (sometimes with a white edge) & Norwood chert is grey with darker grey stripes, also beige with stripes and also black.
    There was definitely trading of chert back in the day as it is common to find Bayport chert points in NW MI and Norwood chert points and chippage in the same locations.
     
  12. boppa,

    All of these relics were found in the Saginaw River basin and the three mentioned arrowheads appear to be Bayport chert.
     
  13. I was helping a friend dig a trench for a footing for his cabin up on the banks of big creek. I was mostly just throwing sand and the digging was easy. I started hitting a vein of river rock with some brightly colored stones, some I set aside to keep. I stuck my shovel into the sand and I must have just caught the edge because a tear drop knife just stood up at attention like a magic trick, luckily I didn't damage the knife, it's totally cool and still has a bit of an edge to it. It has been knapped all around the edges and is a little longer than my hand is wide. Judging by your description from above I'd guess this was Norwood Chert, it is a sandy beige color with some darker striping. I would love to know more about it, but the info on the internet is mostly western plains tribes, I'm thinking this may have been Pottawatomie or one of the local tribes around Luzerne.
    Anyhow I think it's one of the coolest things and I often think of the man or woman who dropped it into the river ages ago.
     
    #43 Sawcat, Nov 5, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2010
  14. Steve, that sand ridge wasn't around Oscoda was it?
     
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