close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Guide service HAH!

Discussion in 'MichiganBear.com' started by NKRAY, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. NKRAY

    NKRAY

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    2
    if you wait 4 or more years to hunt in the carney or amasa area for first season bear and if you want to hunt over bait, DO NOT hire WILD SPIRIT GUIDE service! This man charged $1200 and did not do what he said his service would provide. He baited one spot for me very close to a busy truck trail 70+ vehicle a day drive by and the wind blew my scent right into the bait for 2 1/2 days. He will take your $ and bait where he would have baited anyway so he can hunt with hounds, then tell you that THATS BEAR HUNTING. I've been hunting for 50 years and if he had more than one spot for his customers deeper in the woods I may have actually spotted a black bear. So do your research on bear guides and as always take a reference from someone you trust.
     
    buck11pt24 and Rooster Cogburn like this.
  2. Musket

    Musket Premium Member

    Messages:
    570
    Likes Received:
    115
    Location:
    Pearl Grange

  3. NKRAY

    NKRAY

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hi brothers, thanks for the welcome. Looks like a panther in you living room musket
     
  4. Musket

    Musket Premium Member

    Messages:
    570
    Likes Received:
    115
    Location:
    Pearl Grange
    Hello NKRAY. That's Bullet Lee, last time he was on a scale, it was pushing 34#. His front paws are three fingers wide and cover all four when he stretches them out. You know, I always just want to hit myself in the head with that hammer every time I hear of stories like this. I am certainly not anti guiding and do feel it is an important tool for hunters. I should draw my Wisconsin tag this coming year or next and will be looking for a guided hound hunt. You can bet for sure that I have been and will continue to do my research and definitely will be wanting to hear references. I will not be looking for someone to guarantee me a bear, I will be looking for some one to guarantee me a hunt. I am not going for the cheese, just trying to stay out of the traps.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2016
  5. NKRAY

    NKRAY

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    2
    Now that's a BIG kitty kat Musket,as for my experience with a so called guide that's just my luck. if I didn't live 8hours from that area I would have baited myself and most likely harvested a bruin. I asked if he could bait by my camp in the very northwest corner of Menominee county and he said he would check it out but once I sent half the $ he said he didn't see what we need which was B.S. He didn't want to go down a bumpy trail in bout a mile to my camp cause he wants to just pull off a road walk a short distance and bait. So when hound hunting starts he can benefit from my $ and bait more spots for hound hunts. Two men from a camp near my camp did bait for me and had 5 different bears on camera hitting the bait and some during daylight but when I went back up the hound hunters ran them off and a lot of partridge hunting was going on. So if the guide I hired would have baited by my camp the first five days without hounds in the woods I may have harvested my first bear. Live and learn. I just would not want someone else to get screwed by this so called guide.
     
  6. Bearboy

    Bearboy

    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Western UP
    Hounds do not run off bears unless they run them off and hunters shoot them. Bears come right back to the bait. Lot more to bear hunting than a bait. Later in the season bears eat less or simply hibernate. I'm not totally against hunting guides but cant stand the assumptions people make about the animal based on one experience. I never have hired a guide or guided anyone..and never would. I have baited lots of bears to chase . It sounds like you had a bad experience that I agree with.
     
    SMITTY1233 likes this.
  7. NKRAY

    NKRAY

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    2
     
  8. NKRAY

    NKRAY

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    2
    BearBoy, thanks for that info it's good to gather info from others. I've only hunted twice for bear so that being said I have little experience so next time I get a first season hunt I'll most likely be retired by then and I will be able to just spend more time at camp and bait at least two spots and do my OWN thing.
     
  9. Rooster Cogburn

    Rooster Cogburn

    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    223
    Location:
    western U.P.
    Just a little side note after reading Bearboy's mention of bears hibernating. I have personally found where a bear was denned up the first week of October. I networked with Maine's head bear biologist, Randy Cross....40 years experience. Randy told me about finding one of their collared bears denned on September 15th.

    For folks who are spending big bucks on guided hunts overbait....they need to be a tad skeptical paying to hunt later in the season. Guides will be happy to take your money even though your chances of success are fading once getting into the later part of the season.
     
  10. NKRAY

    NKRAY

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    2
    Rooster cogburn, more info is always a great tool. I did have the first season hunt sept 10 thru 14 and the one spot the so called guide baited was getting hit three nights in a row BUT as I mentioned it was close to a VERY-busy road where I had no confidence it would be hit during daylight. Again he just didn't care to give a bait hunter the best chance at a bear and maybe he's good with hound hunts and it was obvious to me that's
    What's he used my $ for was to bait spots next to a road so he could do a quick scent check with a hound. Thanks again and happy new year!
     
  11. Outtastate

    Outtastate

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for your report and heads up. Do you have a name of the guide you paid, other than the business name?
     
  12. Bearboy

    Bearboy

    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Western UP
    Lots of bears hibernate in northern Wisconsin and the UP in September. Moving seasons later in the year like West Virginia did decreases the sow kill and increases the boars taken.

    If you really want to kill a bear over bait, guided or self guided the first season is the way to go. Even by the second season lots of bears are not eating nearly as much and get quite selective in what they eat. The third season it can be done but really you are wasting your time. Almost all bears eat only at night in October if at all.
     
  13. SMITTY1233

    SMITTY1233

    Messages:
    2,064
    Likes Received:
    486
    Location:
    In Da woods
    Even if not in hibernation their movement and feeding patterns change greatly the later in the year it gets. Lots of factors go into that. However with trail cams and technology today you'd think the guide would have been providing photos of what was hitting the baits and when. You can see the decline in feeding activity every year on trail cams as well as the amount of feed they eat when they do visit.
     
    Rooster Cogburn likes this.
  14. Rooster Cogburn

    Rooster Cogburn

    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    223
    Location:
    western U.P.
    Good stuff Smitty. Adding to the discussion....bears don't always go into full hibernation. I have seen when during a good acorn year some bears will venture out and feed on the mast then return to the den.

    More to the point, hunter success is greatly reduced in the third season and it is wise for folks hiring a guide to know that. The DNR states hunter success on guided hunts in 2016 was 43%, but, if you look at the success of guided hunts for the first season it is significantly higher. No guide in Michigan will ever claim a success rate of
    43%. When I guided a limited number of hunters my success rate was in the very high 90% range, but that's because I would not take peoples money for a 3rd season hunt.

    Here's a quote from a bear biologist from Wyoming: The only thing harvest statistics tell you is what is not there anymore.
     
    kingfisher 11 likes this.