Deer and UV light

Discussion in 'General Michigan Hunting' started by boomer_x7, Oct 7, 2012.


  1. So there is a belief that deer can see UV light, and a hunter wearing clothes with UV brighteners would/may glow. Personaly i cant decide if this is true or not... Anyhow, i notice the newest greatest trail cameras use a black light flash. My understanding is that black light is UV light. (witch is actually a form of blue light????)

    SO.... if deer see UV light wouldnt a blackflash scare them more than a white flash?....
     

    Wanna kill these ads? We can help!
  2. The UV brighteners malarkey I am not buying. There have been countless thousands of deer killed by hunters over the last century and how many of those countless thousands of hunters ever worried about UV brighteners? It's another money grab at the expense of the new hunting population. My clothing that I wear while hunting has never been treated or washed with so-called UV killer and I shoot at least 1 deer per year.
     

  3. According to what I have researched and learned is the deer see the UV light at dawn and dark. Have you ever sit there all day and had deer run by you all day without seeing you and then right at dark get picked out of the tree and wonder why. According to the deer gurus its UV brighteners in your clothes.

    My guess its true to some extent.

    Now to the OP I am not sure why one light scares the deer more than others. I do think the old fashion flash trail cameras negatively effected deer movement around them as it was just something different that they did not like.

    my 2 cents
     
  4. UV.. with my own eyes I can see differences in low light conditions.. DO the deer? I dont know but just encase I do take precautions.. Sure I've killed deer (outside of 20yds) in my UV brighten blue jeans and t-shirt but I am still going to take precautions..to each his own..

    Sorry no opinion on the black flashes..IR works fine for me
     
    #4 sbooy42, Oct 8, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2012
  5. try not to use logic, it messes up the advertising for those guys. sort of like they have so many female deer going into heat, they are able to fill ll those bottle on the shelves with their pee.

    or you can't hunt without scentblockers, or attractant scent, or full body camo,,,you know,,,its amaising the indians didn't starve before we came along.
     
  6. Yeah because them Indians would have never thought to use mud, ash, sticks and leaves to try and blend in...or even the use of a deer or buffalo cape to hide in..

    The white man brought those ideas for marketing

    :lol:
     
  7. I wash my hunting cloths in a UV wash that also has scent free soap. Two birds with one stone, so wether they see it or not im covered and I will always wash my hunting cloths in scent free soap anyway.
     
  8. When I was younger I was not able to climb down from my stand until my dad arrived back to pick me up. One night he came back at twilight and his flashlight had died. As he got around 50 yds I could not believe how much he glowed in his coveralls. Ever since then I thought if he looked like that to me he probably sticks out to the deer as well so I switched away from scent free tide to a detergent without the brighteners....my opinion...dont have one on the cameras really, I use IR
     
  9. Kinda the same as many. It could be true, I'm sure there are studies that have proven it and have disproven it at the same time. Therefore Atsko Sportwash.

    Kills scent, kills UV. $5.
     
  10. Black flash as far as I know is just a filter they use to cover the IR diode array to keep the visible light from getting through. Has nothing to do with UV.
     


  11. A black light, also referred to as a UV light, ultraviolet light, or Wood's lamp, is a lamp that emits Ultraviolet radiation (UV) in the long-wave (near ultraviolet, UVA) range, and little visible light. Other types of ultraviolet lamp emit large amounts of visible light along with the ultraviolet; however, a "black light" usually refers to a lamp that has a dark blue optical filtering material in the glass envelope of the bulb (or the lamp housing) which blocks most of the visible light, so the lamp emits mostly ultraviolet.
     

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