Boat blind/open water

Discussion in 'MichiganWaterfowl.com' started by Retiredducker, Aug 10, 2012.


  1. Have never had much success in various open water boat blinds. Have to admit have never tried it alot, and never had a great diver flight around...never have too many here inland but occasionally. Interested in what level of success others have had. Had an Avery and later a Cabelas but sold them both. Liked the avery better due to the entire blind fitting inside the boat. I know buffies will come to these, but more interested in ringers, bills & reds. Thanks...
     

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  2. lewy149

    lewy149 Banned

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    Early blind or no blind, late if its shallow sit in the water no boat no blind.

    We've killed all kinds with the blind up they get wise put it down, the wise up put the blind back up and keep going
     

  3. lewy149

    lewy149 Banned

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    Sorry I got fast grass blind
     
  4. pretty much agree. I'm no bay expert, but there are times when the dang reds and bb's will about land on a boat blind, and then times when they get skittish. Just gotta play it by ear.

    I agree with sitting right in the water late season, but MAN it gets cold. Especially if there's a bit of a blow, and those dang waves are breaking right on your back :yikes: Been there a few times...not very comfortable, but can be good hunting ;)
     
  5. I hunt alot out of a boat blind and kill them all kinds. You have to read the birds. You my need to move your blind around so they are not looking right at you when coming to the decoys. If you have a dog you need to hide them as well . Any movement will tip them off.
     
  6. Low profile helps for alot of reasons such as wind ect. We have had good luck with my duckwrangler/tdb in open water with the blind up and with the blind down sitting in the bottom of the boat. I am a firm believer in fast grass or something similar as I feel it does a better job of breaking up the unnatural lines of most blinds. We also use a 16' deep-v with a grassed avery that we normally try to set up in pencil reeds just off from deep water with good luck if we have done our homework. If you are in the "X" you can be sitting in a wash tub and shoot divers. Imho.

    Jim

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  7. This would be used in totally open water...no cover. We have a few spots with cover that we hunt from shore...but it is either very shallow and the divers won't work in tight enough or in a cove where the divers simply don't want to come within about 75 yds of shore. Thinking getting out to about 4-8 FOW will help. Thats the depth where they like to hang. Wish there were nice reed beds but no.
     
  8. That's what layout boats are for!

    Otherwise depends how wise the birds are
     
  9. Been that route...had an older kalash that even at only 5'8" was like squeezing into baby bed. Enjoy being in a blind with 2-3 guys. Inland , at least where I am, we don't have enough steady action to cycle three gunners with much success. Just want to have a bit of flexibility when Mallards are a bit scarce.
     
  10. Pontoon. Covered in cedar! That's what everyone around here likes anyhow
     
  11. We've talked about it many times before...cedar kills ducks on the bay ;)
     
  12. If we set up out in the open water its usually because we have been forced out there due to pressure or the divers rafting out there. At that point if you can spot where they are hanging out you will do fine with a little brush and a quick set up with 3or4 dozen decoys. If you pushed them out when you set up chances are they will be back (buffs will be back while you are still setting up). At least that's how things seem to work in the northern part of Huron and the S. M. River. Just remember things can go wrong fast out in the open water so use caution.

    Jim

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     

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